Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dair.nps.edu/handle/123456789/4294
Title: USMC Service Contracts: Analysis of Procurement Requests Within PR Builder
Authors: Samuel Perrine
John Murphy
Keywords: Contracts
Marine Corps
Procurement Requests
Services
PR Builder
Acquisition
Lead Time
Issue Date: 9-Dec-2020
Publisher: Acquisition Research Program
Citation: Published--Unlimited Distribution
Series/Report no.: Service Contracts;NPS-CM-21-005
Abstract: The United States Marine Corps is heavily reliant upon various service contracts to conduct field and garrison activities. With an increase in the amount of service contracts requested by units, there are inefficiencies due to a lack of training for the Marines interpreting requirements, determining if requests are inherently governmental, and processing requests for their units. Additionally, there is a lack of competency across the Marine Corps regarding the purchase request (PR) process and Purchase Request Acquisition Lead Time (PRALT). Analyzing data from PR Builder, the requests for services can be broken down by type of service, dollar amount, and time for approval. This data provides analysts with a measurement for how responsive the service contract PR process is for units with time bound requirements. There is a potential for efficiencies to be gained and more responsive support to the warfighter if the process can be improved from the unit requesting the service and the regional contracting office approving a request and fulfilling requirements. This project seeks to identify the issues associated with the problem of efficiently fulfilling service contract requests and provides recommendations to increase effectiveness of requests and minimize unnecessary risks to units.
Description: Contract Management / Graduate Student Research
URI: https://dair.nps.edu/handle/123456789/4294
Appears in Collections:NPS Graduate Student Theses & Reports

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